Trying to get an idea on what the "standards" across the nation of what are the required out of station time or any and all polices of other organizations.

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This is a massive part of our practice in the UK because of our call connect response target. Our KPI is measured that for all life threats (DELTA calls) an ambulance resource must be on scene within 8 minutes. This is 8 minutes from the moment the person dials 999 and the phone starts ringing.

Therefore dispatchers must allocate a resource within 45 seconds using automatic location software. The crew must them mobilise (driving down the road) within 75 seconds from being paged.

Agencies here have spent millions of pounds trying to get this down to 45 seconds for the crew to be driving to the scene. Staff have to get out of the crew room, to the vehicle open garage doors drive out and close the doors before driving off. We've done time and motion studies, we're operating voiceless dispatching, we have electronic garage doors that are opened by dispatch and closed on an automatic timer and sensor.

It is monitored and there is some give and take...its not like staff take the mick and finish their tea before they go out on the job. But I have seen verbal warnings given, this is more on night shifts when "sleeping" takes place.
Our agency's SOGs stipulate 30 seconds during non-sleep hours and 90 seconds during sleep hours.
90 seconds or better, 90% of the time or better, for call processing at dispatch (first ring to tones).

90 seconds or better, 90% of the time or better, for "out the door" (tones to marked en route by GPS/MDT).

11 min 59 seconds or better, 90% of the time, for ALS ambulance response (first ring to marked at scene by GPS/MDT). Translates to 8 min 59 seconds travel time 90% of the time or better.
We use SSM so we really dont even have an out the door time. Previous place was like 4min?
At the place I work we have 2mins after the tones drop to be rolling out of the ambulance bay. Most crews are out in about 1min after the tones. There is no disaplinary action that I know of if you dont. All of us are there to do a job, so its a pride thing to get going to the call in a short time.
When you say you "use SSM", does that mean the streetcorner posting component so that you are always in your vehicle? Your out-the-door time means the time it takes to move the lever from PARK to DRIVE?

SSM can be much more that streetcorner posting, although it may be one component......

Nathan said:
We use SSM so we really dont even have an out the door time. Previous place was like 4min?
We find at times the roaming/street corner standby parts of the SSM can cause longer "out the door" or mobilisation times than having resources based at the station. Particularly with lone workers on a car who have to find a save place to stop in order to acknowledge and operate the MDT.
We have 90 seconds to push the button on the data terminal to say we are on route after acknowledging on air if in station. Actual performance may vary.

As we mainly have windows. Based analogue terminals their performance varies compared to the new digital ones we have, so many ask if they can be marked en route as they would with a terminal fault so really, the turnout game is an exercise in button pushing rather than performance. 
Where I am employed, we have 3 minutes or less to be responding, by our protocols, 20 min on scene for medicals, 10 min for trauma- unless entrapment or long extrication.
90 seconds to hit the response key on the MDC after being being assigned the call on the MDC. There used to be a delay between the call being assigned on the MDC and our tones going off but dispatch now has software that automatically tones out as soon as the call is assigned. Anything longer than 90 seconds is automatically flagged and is supposed to be looked into by a supervisor.
1 minute to be out the door in the day and 3 minutes to be out the door at night. alot of times people use that time to pee before we leave .. specially females
That would be because patients at night don't need help as fast as patients in the day?

Sounds like an agency that hasn't figured out how to put "patients first."

Patrick Kelley said:
1 minute to be out the door in the day and 3 minutes to be out the door at night. alot of times people use that time to pee before we leave .. specially females

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