Ok this is for the instructors out there. I am teaching my first Basic Course starting August 29th. I am using Emergency Care 12th Edition by Limmer. I have reviewed other programs course syllabus and found that some people actually follow the book chapter for chapter while others group like subjects together and lecture that way. Anyone have any input on this?

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The textbook is a tool, not a requirement.  Like you, I'm getting ready to lead my first EMT class...in prepping for it, I've learned some things;

1) The EMS Ed Standards are the only thing you HAVE to follow.  My experience so far is that textbooks, overall, do an OK job of covering MOST of the standards, but not all.  It's up to us to find the weak points and decide what to do to strengthen them. (On that note, if you find a free HAZWOPER Awareness class that issues a cert, let me know!)

2) You don't have to lecture or hold a class meeting on every standard, nor should you.  If you subject your students to a 2-3 hour class meeting on Non-Traumatic Musculoskeletal Disorders, time to re-evaluate :)  I created a lesson plan for each standard, but varied the technique; since I'm teaching at a university, a 16 week semester is forced on me.  Online lectures are my friend.

3) IMO, grouping like subjects together is a good way to go; you can get the most mileage out of your precious class time.  It doesn't make sense to me to separate brain trauma and head trauma, or spinal column injury from spinal cord injury.  In the same sense, group module topics together; airway management gets it's own module in nearly every text I've seen, but it makes sense (to mea, anyway) to teach it during the same time as shock and resuscitation.  Do what makes sense!

4) Whatever you do, don't use the publisher Powerpoints verbatim.  I swear, those guys must get paid per-slide :)

Hope this helps!  I feel your pain...stepping up to do an EMT class is a helluvalotta work, and many times it doesn't get the credit or attention its' due.  Have fun with the lesson plans and terminal objectives :P

Thank you Ben, It being Friday at 430 I will read this again Monday!! I like the points you brought up.

Ben Dowdy said:

4) Whatever you do, don't use the publisher Powerpoints verbatim.  I swear, those guys must get paid per-slide :)


Personally, I've found the bigger problem is that they appear to have not been made by people with medical training, but by graphic designers who were given the book and told to maker a Powerpoint out of it. :) But they do often make a halfway decent starting point and occasionally have useful lists & graphcis--and I find myself occasionally keeping a stupid slide just so I can talk about what's wrong with it.

Very true...in the interests of time and sanity I've used stock Powerpoints as a template and then edit them, rather than creating a new one from scratch.  By "verbatim", I meant using as-is, without editing.  Also interestingly, I've noticed that the early chapters seem to have more coherent and well-designed lectures, while as you get deeper and deeper into the class the quality goes down.
 
dr-exmedic said:

Ben Dowdy said:

4) Whatever you do, don't use the publisher Powerpoints verbatim.  I swear, those guys must get paid per-slide :)


Personally, I've found the bigger problem is that they appear to have not been made by people with medical training, but by graphic designers who were given the book and told to maker a Powerpoint out of it. :) But they do often make a halfway decent starting point and occasionally have useful lists & graphcis--and I find myself occasionally keeping a stupid slide just so I can talk about what's wrong with it.

Ben Dowdy said:

Also interestingly, I've noticed that the early chapters seem to have more coherent and well-designed lectures, while as you get deeper and deeper into the class the quality goes down.


Earlier stuff is simpler for the graphic designers to understand, maybe? :)

I can easily believe it!  :)

dr-exmedic said:

Ben Dowdy said:

Also interestingly, I've noticed that the early chapters seem to have more coherent and well-designed lectures, while as you get deeper and deeper into the class the quality goes down.


Earlier stuff is simpler for the graphic designers to understand, maybe? :)

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