Motivation is the power that push people to be active and able to do thier jobs without direct supervision and welling to work hard to achieve thier goals .Studies of pofessional behaviors has shown that motivation is the lowest ranked behavior in the EMS field (brown,2005 & AL-harbi,2009). Thier might be some suggestions to raise pre-hospital care providers motivation. I would like to share those ideas and suggestions.

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One thing we could do is be more honest about what the profession is and does before or at the beginning of the educational process.

Today, we recruit new aspirants to a field that they believe will be filled with excitement, an adrenalin rush, constant rescues and code saves and trauma, between which they will be able to sleep and watch TV.  They become angry and disappointed, and de-motivated, when they learn that much of what we do involves transporting sub-acute elderly, indigent people, many who have fallen through the social safety net - which is a surprise, because nobody ever mentioned that in school or in the job interview.

We could also spend a lot more time training and educating people for the real job - languages, communication skills, social services, community program access, etc.

The best motivation I've experienced is wanting to work for particular people within particular companies. Those companies excelled by doing a lot of little things well. Management excelled by demonstrating -- not just verbalizing -- unselfishness, flexibility and ingenuity, while acknowledging that profitability was the primary goal.

I don't think there are a lot of good managers in the essential services. It's a self-perpetuating problem -- it takes good managers to recognize and recruit more good managers. However, that shouldn't stop anyone in a supervisory position from beginning with a simple initiative: manage others the way you want to be managed. That sure would help motivate people.

I agree with you Mr.Mike without the harmony betwwen employees and manager where they became one team, chances of success and wellingness to work will be effected negaticly and hence, i belive that respect and sharing ideas and work issues with employess will enhance the Intrinsic motivation and self-iactuliaztion   as Miller pyramid say on his theory, so pointing our effort to make employee involved in management sure will help to establish healthy atmospher build on trust and respect.

Mike Rubin said:

The best motivation I've experienced is wanting to work for particular people within particular companies. Those companies excelled by doing a lot of little things well. Management excelled by demonstrating -- not just verbalizing -- unselfishness, flexibility and ingenuity, while acknowledging that profitability was the primary goal.

I don't think there are a lot of good managers in the essential services. It's a self-perpetuating problem -- it takes good managers to recognize and recruit more good managers. However, that shouldn't stop anyone in a supervisory position from beginning with a simple initiative: manage others the way you want to be managed. That sure would help motivate people.

Couldn't agree with you more, Mike. Management is probably the biggest thing I try to investigate before even applying for a job. A chief at a service for which I no longer work said, "You don't deserve a staff meeting, all you guys are going to do is complain." This service had a very high turnover and terrible morale due to inconsistent management who used a very dictatorial style and did not seem to care much about the employees as people. 

The service I wnet to after leaving that job is what I wish every job was like. The chief will fill shifts on the street and act as a staff medic. The level of employee participation and leadership allows all of us to feel as if we have a say and our opinions are valued. The chief is still the ultimate authority, but he is always willing to listen.

 

SOmething else that is dirivng me to move on from EMS is that lack of opportunity for much professional growth. Aside from moving into critical care/flgiht, there is really not much else a medic can do. I would happily take more classes if it meant and expanded role like community paramedicine or some other form of advanced practice. When I finish nursing school, I will have a much wider range of opportunities



Mike Rubin said:

The best motivation I've experienced is wanting to work for particular people within particular companies. Those companies excelled by doing a lot of little things well. Management excelled by demonstrating -- not just verbalizing -- unselfishness, flexibility and ingenuity, while acknowledging that profitability was the primary goal.

I don't think there are a lot of good managers in the essential services. It's a self-perpetuating problem -- it takes good managers to recognize and recruit more good managers. However, that shouldn't stop anyone in a supervisory position from beginning with a simple initiative: manage others the way you want to be managed. That sure would help motivate people.

It seems like the point has already been made but treating providers as human beings and not as a object which occupies a seat in an ambulance

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