What CE's are beneficial, interesting and worth going to?

 

As an educator, I have to admit that putting together CE's is a little tasking...people don't want to show up for CE's where there "know it already" so I'm looking for ideas as to what to do next.

 

The practical sessions usually go over pretty well...hands on and enjoyable....but I need some different ways to conduct the lecture portions.

 

Any help would be greatly appreciated!

Tags: CE, Education

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One of my favorite lecture was about tox. The title was something to the effect of "Meds that will kill a pedi in ONE dose". It talked about the wive's tale of rubbing Vick's on an infants feet to soothe crying, ect. Very informative (and a cool title)

Another lecture that I am trying to put together myself covers basic assessment. I'm not talking about ABC-move one. I'm talking about how to not only take a B/P, but interperate it, how to take leg B/P. How to truely understand a pulse ox, from how it works and upward from there.I've seen too may people just "get the numbers" and throw then on a report and never thnk twice. Or worse, I've even see people take a pulse ox reading of 50 on someone whose fingers are Ice Cold and take that reading as solid evidence. This is a good forum to also cover lung sounds. Made even better if you can get good quality examples to play out loud and discuss.

And the best lectures I have been to have included at least SOME research. Wether you cite some studies or even make a lecture out of how to aquire and read them on their own. This is a great way to introduce them to furthering their own knowledge rather than just was they can pick up in your hour or two.

I find that my guys enjoy a little competition in their education. Every 6 to 8 months, I like to hold a review session in an "EMS Jeopardy" showdown. I make up 2 or 3 teams and ask questions based on topics that have been covered in recent EMS trainings. The guys get into the game because they compete against eachother. Its a great way to avoid the "death by powerpoint" aspect of training. it also gives me as the instrcutor feedback on what has stuck in the minds of my providers. If they do well on a topic, I know they were interested or I did a good job of teaching the topic (and I can avoid going over the topic for a while longer). If they do poorly, I know we need to do som remediation.

Waaay back before cell phones and even longer before HIPAA, one of the best attended CE sessions was "telemetry review" where tapes of radio calls to medical control were played.  With good selection, the cases reviewed were intriguing, often humorous and sometimes scary (i.e., when you hear fear in the voice of the guy everybody considers the best medic around as he watches his patient bleed to death from a stab wound, running flat out to a Level 1 trauma center less than three minutes away).

 

It's too bad the audio isn't practical anymore.  But if case reviews are done well they are extremely valuable teaching and learning tools.

I think that's still a good idea. Tapes can be edited to preserve confidentiality. I did this at almost every agency-level presentation when I was supervising medical control. Based on feedback, audiences found it much more entertaining and educational than just listening to me for two hours.

Tim Erskine said:

Waaay back before cell phones and even longer before HIPAA, one of the best attended CE sessions was "telemetry review" where tapes of radio calls to medical control were played.  With good selection, the cases reviewed were intriguing, often humorous and sometimes scary (i.e., when you hear fear in the voice of the guy everybody considers the best medic around as he watches his patient bleed to death from a stab wound, running flat out to a Level 1 trauma center less than three minutes away).

 

It's too bad the audio isn't practical anymore.  But if case reviews are done well they are extremely valuable teaching and learning tools.

There's nothing in HIPAA that says you can't use an OLMC tape for continuing education.  That aside.....

 

Here at Wake County, we have (and I take zero credit for it for myself) the best CE program that I've seen in my entire career (12 different agencies).  At its core are case reviewes, selected by the Office of Medical Affairs (physicians and EMS clinical officers) for their teaching value.  They call it "Just In Time" continuing education, and it is based entirely on what has happened recently in the service.  Sometimes it involves cases that didn't go so well, sometimes it involves cases that went very well.  Sometimes it is based on cases that illustrate key points from the QI program (STEMIs with great event-to-balloon times, traumas with unusual aspects, etc.).  Sometimes it is based on new equipment introduced (new monitors = time to brush up on 12-lead, capnography, etc).  For the case reviews, charts are "blinded" as to patient and medic, and put up on the projector for all to see.  Case studies are presented by the medical director, assistant medical director, or EMS fellow (all physicians).  Supplementary information is presented by paramedic instructors.  Special topics (a good one recently was on clandestine drug lab response, presented by an SBI special agent) are presented as needed or wanted.

 

It only takes a little bit of creativity to make up a matrix of "themes" that correspond to state and national re-credentialing requirements,and to plug case-based education in to assure that at the end of a recertification cycle, all the topics have been covered.  If not, you can have a special session or two.

 

In our model, medics get all required CE from us.  They are free to go to outside courses if they wish, but that does not relieve them of the obligation to get all required CE in-house.

 

Personally, I find case review education far more useful than a powerpoint-based lecture.



Skip Kirkwood said:

There's nothing in HIPAA that says you can't use an OLMC tape for continuing education.  That aside.....

 

Actually, HIPAA is crystal clear when it comes to this. While any identifying patient data would need to be removed prior to playing the call in a CE program, the process to do so would fall under the "Health Care Operations" permitted use.

Another of our better CME sessions in recent years was a day-long "active shooter" session (actually, it takes 5 repetitions to get everyone through) done in cooperation with our school system, two SWAT teams, and some other support.

 

The full day started with a large group lecture/demonstration on active shooters and the standard NC law enforcement response protocol.  We saw a demonstration of "the diamond" and learned how medics would be incorporated in to the LEO groups that would sweep a school and attempt to neutralize the shooter.  After that, we broke in to skills groups. One group went through a "diamond" exercise with LEO teams.  One group worked on patient carrying techniques and practiced with folding MCI stretchers.  Another group stripped and re-packed our MCI truck for familiarization.  Another set up triage, treatment, and transportation, and managed a dozen manikin patients.  Another learned how to remove the typical equipment worn by a SWAT officer to enable assessment and treatment.  Every student rotated through all stations.  It was a long and tiring day, but great practical CME - which was put to actual use 18 months later when an active shooter let loose in a Target (!) store.  Medics accompanied the LEOs in the "diamond," found the shooter (who had killed himself), assessed his condition, and backed out while LEOs cleared the rest of the store.

 

When CE has practical application, it enhances the appreciation of the course.

We use a format virtually identical to Wake's for the services under our command, with quarterly case reviews (cases generally selected by us, though we're always asking the medics to recommend cases), and we try to pick several cases with a theme and teaching points, concluded with a mini-lecture kind of wrapping everything up.  We let the medics involved present the pts (if they're there), which is nice because sometimes they'll come up with details that weren't in the tripsheets.

 

The other thing (and this is a little more difficult) is to find something that is basically glossed over by many instructors in paramedic school because it seems irrelevant, then make it relevant.  I actually had pretty decent attendance at 1-hour class (at 8am, no less!) on how do do a cranial nerve assessment in 60 seconds.

 

Or you can just go for ridiculous.  I'm actually giving a lecture this March entitled "Zombies! and other CNS derangements," which is just a more fun way to look at things like meningitis, encephalitis, etc.

It would probably be useful (though maybe not much fun) for many medics to get some CE on a variety of psycho-social-community health issues, particularly if they find themselves (wittingly or unwittingly) in the position of trying to help people whose issues are not "emergent" medical or trauma.

 

  • The structure and function of the local indigent care system (public health, community health centers, etc.)
  • The structure, function, and access points for mental health, chronic inebriates, and substance abuse issues.
  • Grief management and immediate post-death interventions in the community (what is the right thing to do with those codes that are discontinued, and how do we assist and support the family?).
  • Indigent care and poverty-driven health status issues.
  • Multi-cultural medical and community health issues.

Enough of these and we might see some better partnerships with local community and public health entities.

 

We recently had an in-service by an investigator from the state ME's office who handled child fatalities.  It was a real eye opener.

 

I recently did a CE class on stress relief and debrief. I gave information on when, how, where to get stress debriefing as well as tips on self guided imagery, relaxation techniques ect.. Then I brought in a massage therapist to talk about the benefits of massge therapy as well as give "demonstrations" (mini chair massages) It was my most talked about class! lol

That's a pretty cool idea.  Could help with developing a department-wide format for report call-ins, if not already in place.  And, Training or the QI/QA Office should be able to edit the Audio to remove any "Specifics". 

Tim Erskine said:

Waaay back before cell phones and even longer before HIPAA, one of the best attended CE sessions was "telemetry review" where tapes of radio calls to medical control were played.  With good selection, the cases reviewed were intriguing, often humorous and sometimes scary (i.e., when you hear fear in the voice of the guy everybody considers the best medic around as he watches his patient bleed to death from a stab wound, running flat out to a Level 1 trauma center less than three minutes away).

 

It's too bad the audio isn't practical anymore.  But if case reviews are done well they are extremely valuable teaching and learning tools.

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